The Import of Haymond

Later this month, the Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in United States v Haymond, a case that tests the legality of increased mandatory minimums and maximums for sex offenders who are accused of committing another sex offense while on release. Haymond had the misfortune to get malware on his smartphone, which gave him all sorts of nasty little goodies, including child pornography. As the evidence was pretty conclusive that he did not deliberately download these files, the Government tried to convict him through the back door of revoking his supervised release.

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Reexamining Smith v. Doe (Part Four)

Editor’s Note: This is the final part of the series where we have reviewed the Supreme Court case of Smith v. Doe, in which is ruled the sex offender registry constitutional. Last Tuesday (Oct. 2), the Supreme Court heard another registry case in Gundy v. United States. We are in the process of reviewing the transcripts from the oral arguments and hope to have our analysis done by next week. Continue reading “Reexamining Smith v. Doe (Part Four)”